Art

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    They Shall Not Have Me
    The Capture, Forced Labor, and Escape of a French Prisoner in World War II
    Jean Hélion
    (Arcade Publishing)
    A daring story of imprisonment and escape under the Nazi regime and a moving and engrossing symbol of resilience and integrity.The French painter Jean Hélion’s unique and deeply moving account of his experiences in Nazi prisoner of war camps prefigures the even darker stories that would emerge from the... [READ MORE]
    Paris Without End
    On French Art Since World War I
    Jed Perl
    (Arcade Publishing)
    This brilliant blend of history, biography, and criticism explores the seminal figures of twentieth-century French art—Matisse, Picasso, Derain, Léger, Dufy, Braque, Giacometti, Balthus, and Hélion—and the vital art world in which they thrived.The ten interlocking essays in this important book include... [READ MORE]
    Double Rhythm
    Writings About Painting
    Jean Hélion, Deborah Rosenthal
    (Arcade Publishing)
    Jean Hélion, the French painter who died at eighty-three in 1987, brought together in his copious and essential writing on art the theoretical authority of the intellectual and the fundamental insights of the craftsman in his studio. His writing extended throughout the five decades or more of his career.Soon... [READ MORE]
    Marcel Duchamp
    Appearance Stripped Bare
    Octavio Paz
    (Arcade Publishing)
    Octavio Paz claims in this essential work that the two painters who had the greatest influence on the twentieth century were Pablo Picasso and Marcel Duchamp. If that conjunction surprises at first, Paz makes a convincing case with his analysis and by contrasting the two artists. “I have linked their... [READ MORE]
    The Changing Concept of Reality in Art
    Deborah Rosenthal, Erwin Rosenthal
    (Arcade Publishing)
    "The transmutation of artistic form," writes Erwin Rosenthal, "depends on individual decisions and cultural development. But there are basic laws of self-expression which do not change, which are perpetual because they accord with the structure of the human mind and soul." These penetrating studies explore... [READ MORE]
    The Calder Family and Other Critters
    Portraits and Reflections
    Sandra Calder Davidson, Jed Perl
    (Arcade Publishing)
    Alexander Calder was one of the most original artists of the twentieth century and a major figure in American art. Renowned for his mobiles and stabiles, he also created the beloved Calder Circus, an early performance piece now preserved at the Whitney Museum. He was a contemporary and friend of Marcel... [READ MORE]
    The Whitney Women and the Museum They Made
    A Family Memoir
    Flora Miller Biddle
    (Arcade Publishing)
    Until Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney opened her studio on Eighth Street in Manhattan in 1914—which evolved into the Whitney Museum almost two decades later—there were few art museums in the United States, let alone galleries, for contemporary artists to exhibit their work. When the mansions of the wealthy... [READ MORE]
    The Elgin Affair
    The True Story of the Greatest Theft in History
    Theodore Vrettos
    (Arcade Publishing)
    Almost two hundred years after they were “purchased” from Greece, the finest and most famous marbles of antiquity still remain a burning issue. This compelling, controversial story of the Elgin marbles re-creates in full and colorful detail “the greatest art theft in history,” a steamy tale of obsession,... [READ MORE]
    Contemporary Art in the Light of History
    Erwin Rosenthal, Deborah Rosenthal, Lance Esplund
    (Arcade Publishing)
    Erwin Rosenthal’s Contemporary Art in the Light of History, originally published in 1971, is a small masterpiece of writing on the art of the twentieth century. A scholar of medieval art by training and a prominent antiquarian bookseller, Rosenthal, who died in l981, was equally entranced by modern art,... [READ MORE]
    Marcel Duchamp
    Octavio Paz
    (Arcade Publishing)
    Octavio Paz conveying “his awareness of Duchamp as a great cautionary figure in our culture, warning us with jest and quiet scandals of the menacing encroachment of criticism, science and even art.” —New York Times Book Review... [READ MORE]
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